Undergraduate Major in Neuroscience

At the University of Chicago, there are several ways undergraduate students can incorporate coursework which spans the breadth of neuroscience, reflecting the interests of a large and diverse faculty in such research areas as neurodevelopment, synaptic physiology, cortical circuits, sensation, perception, motor function, reward and addiction, cognitive neuroscience, computational neuroscience, neural networks, machine learning, and the neurobiology of disease neuroscience into their academic experiences and careers. The new undergraduate neuroscience major offers a BA or BS in Neuroscience. Students may choose electives for breadth or focus on areas such as molecular or computational neuroscience. The Honors program involves a thesis based on significant experimental research.

Students are required to discuss curriculum goals and obtain approval for Neuroscience electives with the Neuroscience Major Director.  Students should fill out an approval form to be signed by the director before registration. For more information visit the College Course Catalog.

Neuroscience Lunches

Come learn about exciting research on campus. Faculty members with diverse interests will talk informally about their work. This will not be a lecture with slides. Instead, this is an opportunity to have a conversation about the big questions that keep these scientists up at night, their thoughts about science, and a life informed by science. If you are interested in getting into research, this is an excellent way to narrow down the type of approaches and topics that are particularly appealing. Space is limited. So sign up now.

Registration ends at 4 pm on the day before the lunch but space is limited. So sign up now by clicking on the lunch or lunches that you are interested in and filling out the corresponding form to choose your lunch. Note that no-shows will not be able to attend future lunches. Please email grossmaninstitute@uchicago.edu if you will not be able to attend.

Au Bon Pain Menu

February 21st Lunch with Paschalis Kratsios PhD (Motor Neuron Development)

This lunch will take place on February 21st at 12pm. The lunch will be held in the Grossman Institute (5812 S. Ellis), P-403. 5812 S. Ellis Ave, Surgery Brain Research Pavilion, is the building just south of the bookstore on Ellis. As this is an entrance to hospital, you will be asked to present your ID at the security desk. Go to the left and then up to the 4th floor. Weave around to the left to reach P-403 Additional information and directions will be sent in your confirmation email. For further questions, please email info@grossmaninstitute.org.

Lunch with Paschalis Kratsios PhD
Dr Kratsios is interested in the development and evolution of locomotion, a highly conserved activity that is fundamental to the presence of a nervous system. He employs the nematode worm known as C elegans to ask important questions about how different types of neurons develop, make appropriate connections, and assemble to serve different adaptive endpoints.

This event has reached its capacity. Please email info@grossmaninstitute.org if you are interested in learning about slots opening due to cancelations.

March 6th Lunch with Jason Maclean PhD (Neocortical Circuits)

This lunch will take place on March 6th at 12pm. The lunch will be held in the Grossman Institute (5812 S. Ellis), P-403 5812 S. Ellis Ave, Surgery Brain Research Pavilion, is the building just south of the bookstore on Ellis. As this is an entrance to hospital, you will be asked to present your ID at the security desk. Go to the left and then up to the 4th floor. Weave around to the left to reach P-403 Additional information and directions will be sent in your confirmation email. For further questions, please email info@grossmaninstitute.org.

Lunch with Jason MacLean PhD
Dr MacLean is interested in how cortical circuits work to represent the world and guide behavior. He uses an impressively broad set of approaches including multi-neuronal monitoring in both slices and more recently, in awake, behaving mice who are reaching for and eating seeds. Dr MacLean also uses theoretical modeling to test ideas and stimulate new experiments. Dr MacLean teaches a popular course on the neocortex and is a sought after research mentor.

March 6th Lunch

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March 9th Lunch with Ming Xing PhD (Neuro Linguistics)

This lunch will take place on March 9th at 12pm. The lunch will be held in the Grossman Institute (5812 S. Ellis), P-403 5812 S. Ellis Ave, Surgery Brain Research Pavilion, is the building just south of the bookstore on Ellis. As this is an entrance to hospital, you will be asked to present your ID at the security desk. Go to the left and then up to the 4th floor. Weave around to the left to reach P-403 Additional information and directions will be sent in your confirmation email. For further questions, please email info@grossmaninstitute.org.

Lunch with Ming Xiang PhD
Dr Xiang is interested in psycholinguistics and most especially in the linguistic representations used for language comprehension and how these representations come into being. A variety of methodologies including event-related potentials recorded using brain EEG techniques and eye tracking are used in coordination with reading to get at fundamental questions about how language is processed into meaning.

This event has reached its capacity. Please email info@grossmaninstitute.org if you are interested in learning about slots opening due to cancelations.

April 27th Lunch with Ellie Heckscher PhD (Motor Circuit Development)

This lunch will take place on April 27th at 12pm. The lunch will be held in the Grossman Institute (5812 S. Ellis), P-403 5812 S. Ellis Ave, Surgery Brain Research Pavilion, is the building just south of the bookstore on Ellis. As this is an entrance to hospital, you will be asked to present your ID at the security desk. Go to the left and then up to the 4th floor. Weave around to the left to reach P-403 Additional information and directions will be sent in your confirmation email. For further questions, please email info@grossmaninstitute.org.

Lunch with Ellie Heckscher PhD
Dr Heckscher is interested in the function and development of motor circuits. She uses both physiological recording and optogenetic manipulations of specific neurons to understand how flies (Drosophila) move. Using her cellular understanding of motor circuits, Dr Heckscheralso examines how these circuits come to be during larval development, with the hopes that eventually this work will inform efforts to reprogram diseased neurons to behave themselves properly.

April 27th Lunch

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Summer Research In Paris

These are paid internships which support 10 weeks of independent research in Paris at the elite College de France, read more

Study Abroad in Paris

Study neuroscience at University of Chicago’s Center in Paris during the fall quarter. Neuroscience majors are encouraged to apply, read more

Journal clubs

For those of you who just can’t get enough neuroscience, consider joining a journal club. Two new journal clubs oriented specifically for undergraduate Neuroscience majors are starting up and two established journal clubs are open to more undergraduate members. Below is the information. Please email the contacts directly if you want to join.

Neurophilosophy, Friday 2-3pm (Green 117)
Contact: Clifford Workman (cliffworkman@uchicago.edu)

Neuroimmunology, Friday 12-1 (KCBD 9260)
Contact: Kishan Sangani (ksangani@uchicago.edu); Elaine Kouame (ekouame@uchicago.edu)

Computational approaches to cognitive neuroscience, Thursday 5-6 (SBRI J-400C/ Green room)
Contact: Barbara Peysakhovich (bpeysakhovich@uchicago.edu); Krithika Mohan (krmohan@uchicago.edu)

Biopsychology (centered in Kay, London, Prendergast laboratories), M 4-5 (BPSB#123)
Contact: Joe Gogola (gogola@uchicago.edu)

Neuroscience Research Metcalf Internship

Neuroscience Research Metcalf Internships provide opportunities for students to conduct independent research during the summer. Applications for the Neuroscience Research Internship are due April 4th click here to apply.

The Think Tank

TTT is a mobile neuroscience lab, powered by UChicago to accelerate diversity in STEM. Using a multifaceted strategy, TTT engages not only students but also their teachers and families to accomplish their mission of creating a scientific community that reflects the diversity found on our city’s streets.

To find out more about this program and how to get involved click here for more information.

The NEURO Club

The Neuroscience Education, Undergraduate Research & Outreach (NEURO) Club is a Registered Student Organization (RSO) at the University of Chicago centered around those interested in the field of Neuroscience and educating the on-campus and surrounding community about Neuroscience.

To find out more about this club and how to get involved click here for more information.